Air Programs International (Australia)

From CLG Wiki

Logo descriptions by Tlogos and Eric S.
Logo captures by Eric S., and TrickyMario7654
Video captures courtesy of enjime


Background

"API" stands for "Air Programs International".

(1969-1975?)


Nicknames: "Spinning Vortex", "Vortex of Doom", "The Spinning Propeller of Doom", "Crazy Looking Koru", "API Tornado", "70's Aussie Beyblade", “The Original Fidget Spinner”

Logo: We start out with a white background. Then, a rapidly spinning black vortex comes from the left and stops in the middle, rapidly spinning clockwise as it does so. after a few more seconds. The vortex zooms back and shifts to the right while spinning. As this does so, the letters "a p i" in purple (the letters themselves resemble Futura) began zooming from all sides of the screen until coming together. The camera zooms out and in and out as this happens. The vortex begins to spin next to the "i" until it comes to a complete stop, which makes the "i" overlap one of the tips of the vortex. the words "TELEVISION PRODUCTION" appears on the bottom of the text and vortex, set in Microgramma.

Variants:

  • In the very ending of Arthur! and the Square Knights of the Round Table closing credits, after King Arthur falls off the stage, the camera zooms-in to the (white) background of the stage, and the logo begins.
  • Some projects superimposed the print logo with an in-credit notice.

FX/SFX: The vortex spinning, and the letters coming.

Music/Sounds: A whooshing synth note when the vortex comes, followed by a sped-up/+12 pitch version of a classic Hanna-Barbera descending synth sound, and 3 loud synth dings when the letters come, ending with a timpani drum solo.

Availability: Ultra rare. Appeared on The Story of the First Christmas as API Television Productions, and on Heidi (1978 TV series) as A.P.I. Television Productions. The Active Home Video release of Arthur! and the Square Knights of the Round Table(also in original TV airings) might have it. The in-credit notices should be intact on such projects.

Editor's Note: The zooming in and out, the weird music and the rapid speed of the vortex's spinning can unnerve more than a few, not to mention the spinning may make you be dizzy. You can really tell that the vortex is stop-motion animation. The appearance of the words seem wrong. The film is very poor and grainy, and what's the idea of the camera zooming in and out? It also might remind you of a Beyblade.